Early cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use of Automated External Defibrillators by laypersons in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest using an SMS alert service

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Scholten, Annemieke C. and Manen, Jeannette G. van and Worp, Wim E. van der and IJzerman, Maarten J. and Doggen, Carine J.M. (2011) Early cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use of Automated External Defibrillators by laypersons in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest using an SMS alert service. Resuscitation, 82 (10). pp. 1273-1278. ISSN 0300-9572

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Abstract:Aim:
To evaluate an SMS service (SMS = short message service = text message) with which laypersons are alerted to go to patients with suspected out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and perform early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and use an Automated External Defibrillator (AED). This study is the first to report on a program in which an emergency medical service (EMS) is able to alert citizens by sending them SMS messages on their mobile phone. -

Methods:
Web-based questionnaires were completed by laypersons who were sent an alert by the AED-Alert system between February 1, 2010 and April 30, 2010. Questions concerned the process of training, receiving alerts, actions taken and follow-up care. -

Results:
AED-Alert was activated for 52 patients suspected of cardiac arrest, sending 3227 alerts to 2287 laypersons. Out of 2168 eligible laypersons 1679 (77%) completed 2098 questionnaires, one for each alert. Action was taken in only 579 alerts. Laypersons were not in the patient's vicinity (41%), noticed alerts too late (35%), or other reasons (24%). In 298 alerts laypersons faced problems with retrieving AEDs (51%), finding addresses (29%), traffic (5%), or other (15%). Aid was provided in 75 alerts, involving 47 patients. Laypersons started early CPR and defibrillation (49%), assisted EMS personnel (52%), or took care of family (39%). Laypersons arrived before EMS personnel in 21 patients, started CPR and defibrillation in 18, and assisted EMS personnel in 9 patients. -

Conclusion:
Improvements of the SMS alert service by laypersons, the EMS, and through technical adjustments, could increase the number of laypersons who provide early aid.
Item Type:Article
Copyright:© 2011 Elsevier
Faculty:
Management and Governance (SMG)
Research Group:
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/publications/77827
Official URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2011.05.008
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