Practice schedule and cognitive style interaction in learning a maze task

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Jelsma, Otto and Pieters, Jules M. (1989) Practice schedule and cognitive style interaction in learning a maze task. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 3 (1). pp. 73-83. ISSN 0888-4080

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Abstract:In the present study the effects of contextual interference on the retention and transfer performance of reflectives and impulsives on a maze task were studied. Forty-seven subjects were randomly assigned to either a high contextual interference group or to a low contextual interference group. Within the two groups subjects were further classified according to their preferred modes of responding. Retention and transfer were measured immediately following practice and after a 4-week delay. The dependent variables were tracing time and errors. Reflectives made fewer errors and moved more quickly after practising under conditions of high contextual interference. Impulsives tended to have fewer errors after practising under conditions of high contextual interference but moved more slowly. Based on these results it was suggested that trainers consider individual differences in reflectivity-impulsivity before designing particular practice schedules.
Item Type:Article
Copyright:© 1989 Wiley InterScience
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Behavioural Sciences (BS)
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Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/publications/70880
Official URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.2350030108
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