Preferences for Third-Party Help in Workplace Conflict: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Chinese and Dutch Employees

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Giebels, Ellen and Yang, Huadong (2009) Preferences for Third-Party Help in Workplace Conflict: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Chinese and Dutch Employees. Negotiation and Conflict Management Research, 2 (4). pp. 344-362. ISSN 1750-4708

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Abstract:This study examines conflict parties’ preferences for different
types of third-party help and how this may be
influenced by cultural differences in terms of individualism/
collectivism. We focus our analysis on process-related
nonsubstantive help and identify three types of thirdparty
help in interpersonal conflict situations: relational
help, procedural help, and emotional help. In a pilot
study with Chinese and Dutch students (N = 93), we first
developed and validated three new scales to measure preferences
for the three types of third-party help. To further
test specific hypotheses we used another sample of Dutch
and Hong Kong Chinese bank employees (N = 71). In
line with our expectations, Chinese employees report a
higher preference for relational help, while Dutch
employees report a higher preference for emotional help.
In terms of procedural help, there was no significant difference
between Dutch and Chinese employees. Furthermore,
additional analyses revealed a gender effect on the
preference for emotional help, showing that—regardless
of their cultural background—females prefer this type of
third-party help more, presumably because they experience
more conflict stress.
Item Type:Article
Copyright:© 2009 Wiley
Faculty:
Behavioural Sciences (BS)
Research Group:
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/publications/68569
Official URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1750-4716.2009.00044.x
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Metis ID: 258569