The Role of the Need for Cognitive Closure in the Effectiveness of the Disrupt-Then-Reframe Influence Technique

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Kardes, Frank R. and Fennis, Bob M. and Hirt, Edward R. and Tormala, Zakary L. and Bullington, Brian (2007) The Role of the Need for Cognitive Closure in the Effectiveness of the Disrupt-Then-Reframe Influence Technique. Journal of Consumer Research, 34 (3). pp. 377-385. ISSN 0093-5301

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Abstract:The disrupt-then-reframe (DTR) influence technique involves confusing consumers with a disruptive message and then reducing ambiguity by reframing the message. Experiment 1 shows that the DTR technique increases retail sales in a supermarket setting. Experiment 2 shows that the DTR technique increases the willingness to pay to join a student interest group. Experiment 3 shows that the DTR technique increases student support for a tuition increase. The results also show that the DTR effect increases as the need for closure increases and that disruption motivates consumers to embrace a reframed message that facilitates closure by reducing ambiguity.
Item Type:Article
Copyright:© 2007 Journal of Consumer Research Inc
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Behavioural Sciences (BS)
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Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/publications/58592
Official URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/518541
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