Children and Videogames: Leisure Activities, Aggression, Social Integration, and School Performance

Share/Save/Bookmark

Schie van, Emil G.M. and Wiegman, Oene (1997) Children and Videogames: Leisure Activities, Aggression, Social Integration, and School Performance. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 27 (13). pp. 1175-1194. ISSN 0021-9029

[img]
Preview
PDF
1022Kb
Abstract:A survey was conducted among 346 children from the 7th and 8th grade of 7 elementary schools to examine possible positive and negative effects of playing videogames. Analyses revealed that playing videogames did not appear to take place at the expense of children's other leisure activities, social integration, and school performance. A gender difference arose: Boys spent more time playing videogames than did girls. There was no significant relationship between the amount of time children spent on videogames and aggressive behavior. A negative relationship between time spent playing videogames and prosocial behavior was found; however, this relationship did not appear in separate analyses for boys and girls. Furthermore, a positive relationship was found between time spent on videogames and a child's intelligence.
Item Type:Article
Copyright:© 1997 Blackwell
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/publications/58308
Official URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-1816.1997.tb01800.x
Export this item as:BibTeX
EndNote
HTML Citation
Reference Manager

 

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Metis ID: 148712