How Science Is Applied in Technology

Share/Save/Bookmark

Boon, Mieke (2006) How Science Is Applied in Technology. International studies in the philosophy of science, 20 (1). pp. 27-47. ISSN 02698595

[img] PDF
Restricted to UT campus only
: Request a copy
92kB
[img]
Preview
PDF
202kB
Abstract:Unlike basic sciences, scientific research in advanced technologies aims to explain, predict, and (mathematically) describe not phenomena in nature, but phenomena in technological artefacts, thereby producing knowledge that is utilized in technological design. This article first explains why the covering-law view of applying science is inadequate for characterizing this research practice. Instead, the covering-law approach and causal explanation are integrated in this practice. Ludwig Prandtl's approach to concrete fluid flows is used as an example of scientific research in the engineering sciences. A methodology of distinguishing between regions in space and/or phases in time that show distinct physical behaviours is specific to this research practice. Accordingly, two types of models specific to the engineering sciences are introduced. The diagrammatic model represents the causal explanation of physical behaviour in distinct spatial regions or time phases; the nomo-mathematical model represents the phenomenon in terms of a set of mathematically formulated laws.
Item Type:Article
Copyright:© 2006 Inter-University Foundation
Faculty:
Behavioural Sciences (BS)
Research Group:
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/publications/57964
Official URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02698590600640992
Export this item as:BibTeX
EndNote
HTML Citation
Reference Manager

 

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Metis ID: 232715